Shiny

A couple of shiny new bits of software have come out in the last few weeks. Both of them are at version 7, for some reason.

Inform 7

Inform 7 is the latest version of Inform, the language for creating interactive fiction. The interesting thing about it is that Inform 7 programs are written in a subset of English:

The wood-slatted crate is in the Gazebo. The crate is a container. Instead of taking the crate, say “It’s far too heavy to lift.”

Inform is not capable of understanding arbitrary written English, but has a set of sentence forms it understands, and some inference rules built in (for example, if you tell it that “Mr Brown wears a hat”, it will infer that Mr Brown is a person).

scribb1e pointed out that this makes the work of writing the story similar to playing it. That could turn out to be a bad thing: most programming languages are so stylised and full of random punctuation symbols that programmers realise they’re not writing English and don’t try writing arbitrary English text in the hope of being understood by the computer. Even for people who understand Inform isn’t actually intelligent and that they have to write in Inform’s dialect to be understood, writing in something close to English will make it harder to remember to restrict their vocabulary. At worst, it could become a game of guess the verb, which would be painful (as opposed to a game of Guess The Verb, which I thought was fun, especially the Old Man River bit in the help).

However, unlike playing a game, looking at the excellent and witty online help doesn’t risk spoiling your fun. Since it’s all English, it’s easy to crib paragraphs of text from the examples and adapt them to your own works. Hopefully, writing the games in English will enable more people to create them without feeling that they have to be expert programmers. They’ll still have to think like a programmer, but won’t face the intimidating prospect of curly brackets.

Inform 7 itself isn’t just the compiler, it’s is a complete suite of tools for writing, testing and releasing interactive fiction, the IF equivalent of an Integrated Development Environment. It’s rather nice (although not yet available for anything other than Windows and Mac OS, because of the difficulty of getting the graphical stuff going on a variety of platforms).

Vim 7

I use the Vim editor, which is the old Unix vi with all the features you want from a modern programmer’s editor bolted on. New in Vim 7 there’s a spelling checker, “IntellisenseTM” style context-sensitive completion of names in code, and tabbed windows (no software is complete without tabbed windows these days).

The completion stuff is particularly useful, as it now pops up a menu of possible completions which you can select from with the cursor keys, and appears to be trying harder to find completions from nearby files in the background as you’re typing (I’ve not quite worked out what it’s doing yet, it’s reaching the stage where it’s just magic). Completion isn’t just for programmers, of course: when I’m typing an email, if I find myself using the same, long, word more than once, typing the initial letters and then letting Vim complete it is a boon.

Just Read The Instructions

I much prefer old, depressive-to-rival-Leonard-Cohen Counting Crows to new, happy Counting Crows.

It’s quieter now all those weddings and barbeques have subsided for a bit. Me and she had a lovely evening with Gareth and Emma the other night. Gareth is the Scourge of Uk.religion.christian, putting nutters to flight with his rapier-like logic. Or something.

I remember mentioning Leonard Richardson’s Guess the Verb interactive fiction game, Munchkin, and opportunitygrrl (whose interests include geology, interplanetary video feeds, Mars, and Christina Aguilera).

Speaking of interactive fiction, I remember I promised terriem some links to IF works recommended by S. terriem also pointed me at Kingdom of Loathing, which I’ve not tried yet. I played through Slouching Towards Bedlam and enjoyed it, although I did have to resort to the help a couple of times. Still, the story’s the thing in this one, not the puzzles so much.

S also recommended 9:05 (which is short and funny in a twisted sort of way), and Spider and Web (which I’ve played a little way, and which is apparently longer). Get them from Home of the Underdogs in their IF section. To play them, you’ll need an interpreter which runs the files. On the Mac, I got Frotz from Fink for the .z5 files and MaxTADs for the TADS ones. This page lists IF interpreters for Windows. There’s a selection of Beginner’s Guides to help with the conventions of the medium.